racheljamiebaldwin:

Daria Addams! Thanks @horrorgirl for letting me tattoo you (and for trusting me with the concept!) #daria #wednesdayaddams #wednesday #90s #topshopgoth @boldasbrasstattoo

#pittsfield #colorlove

#layers #pittsfield #nh #fall #reflection #leaves

OK last one. I don’t know what happened here but I like it. #light #shine #tension #leaves #nh #water

I see you dude. #pittsfield #fall #nh #colorlove #bug

(Source: etsy.com)

knitterswithattitude:


On friday, one week before comiccon, I remembered this scene from bob’s burgers. I had to go for it. So I worked really hard with the help of espphoto​ to get this done in a week. It was knit plain and then the yellow lettering was duplicate stitched on top to save time.
The color chart is posted here and can be used on any sweater (or anything) that’s more than 48 stitches across. There’s no pattern for the sweater because it was improvised. It’s pretty cool to know that I can make a body first and then calculate a sleeve cap to perfectly fit in the armscye without any problems. Set in sleeves are my favorite patterns to draft and seam.
I’ll post some photos of the con later this week.

knitterswithattitude:


On friday, one week before comiccon, I remembered this scene from bob’s burgers. I had to go for it. So I worked really hard with the help of espphoto​ to get this done in a week. It was knit plain and then the yellow lettering was duplicate stitched on top to save time.
The color chart is posted here and can be used on any sweater (or anything) that’s more than 48 stitches across. There’s no pattern for the sweater because it was improvised. It’s pretty cool to know that I can make a body first and then calculate a sleeve cap to perfectly fit in the armscye without any problems. Set in sleeves are my favorite patterns to draft and seam.
I’ll post some photos of the con later this week.

knitterswithattitude:

On friday, one week before comiccon, I remembered this scene from bob’s burgers. I had to go for it. So I worked really hard with the help of espphoto to get this done in a week. It was knit plain and then the yellow lettering was duplicate stitched on top to save time.

The color chart is posted here and can be used on any sweater (or anything) that’s more than 48 stitches across. There’s no pattern for the sweater because it was improvised. It’s pretty cool to know that I can make a body first and then calculate a sleeve cap to perfectly fit in the armscye without any problems. Set in sleeves are my favorite patterns to draft and seam.

I’ll post some photos of the con later this week.

jewlesthemagnificent:

starkexpos:

buzzfeed:

itriedthatonceitwasabadmove:

austinabridged:

itriedthatonceitwasabadmove:

As a professional internet, it’s my job to search the web for quality, intellectually stimulating content. Like this.

The heavens parted, and delivered unto us a scion of hope, a glimmer of immortality. This song.

Its been a few hours since I posted this and I’m pretty sure I’ve gone back to listen to it about twelve times now and each time it still makes me almost develop a hernia from laughing so much.

i’ve never loved something the way i love this post

WHY IS THIS SO FUNNY?

LOLOLOL I’m sweating. holy shit. 

"I do not need someone to complete me
but if you wanted to
we could walk next to each other
into whatever is coming next."
— Meghan Lynn (via tiredestprincess)

(Source: merelyamadness)

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art Society, Milne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.
[via Colossal]

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

(Source: ephe)

myfitness-app:

Go with your gut.

You’d think after spending so much time alone I’d be used to it by now.